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Mixed Responses Received From Parents Amidst FDA Gearing Up For Authorizing Pfizer’s Covid-19 Vaccine For Teens

Mixed Responses Received From Parents Amidst FDA Gearing Up For Authorizing Pfizer’s Covid-19 Vaccine For Teens

The authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for Covid-19 by the Food and Drug Administration got people extremely elated. The sanctioning of the vaccine for children aged between 12- to 15-years received an impetus. Thus, following the directive of ramping up of the facilities in the coming days. One that got Kim Hagood hopeful. 

Mixed Responses Received From Parents Amidst FDA Gearing Up For Authorizing Pfizer’s Covid-19 Vaccine For Teens

Though there is still a long way for her son Blake to make it to the list due to age-related criteria, however, there is a glimmer of hope with an announcement by the company during its quarterly earnings call. One that specified authorizing the vaccine within September to include children aged between 2 to 11. 

Mixed Responses Received From Parents Amidst FDA Gearing Up For Authorizing Pfizer’s Covid-19 Vaccine For Teens

Hagood stated how she is excited at the prospect that his son can get his shot by the end of this year. Hagood herself received her one shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine around April. She clears the air on how she does not want the one ending up at the hospital bed to be her son.

Several different opinions are cropping up, crowding the minds of the parents. A survey conducted in March stated a massive decline in the ratio. 

One that reflects the differences between parents wanting to get themselves vaccinated to the ones wanting their children to be vaccinated as well. The ratio portrays the widening gap of 71 to 58 percent, as reported by a national organization called ParentsTogether. 

Thirty-two percent of parents thought to wait it out just to determine the efficacy of the vaccine before their children being vaccinated. This was reported in April in a survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Vaccine Monitor. While the share of parents not agreeing to get their children vaccinated at all stood at 19 percent. 

A pediatrician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Mary Carol, briefed how parents tend to be more alert if it’s related to their children. The proverb of there are two sides to a coin is so apt in this scenario. 

There is a set of parents who are showcasing inhibition in being the first to get their children vaccinated. At the same time, there is another set that wants to be the first in line.

Several issues have cropped up since March in the survey reports by ParentsTogether. These include the vaccine development rate, lack of opportunities for longer-term studies, side effects for both short and long terms, etc. A major gap was found amongst the black parents in comparison to the Hispanic parents. 

The black parents mostly showcased hesitance specifying how less likely they are to get vaccinated. Wherein respondents numbering as high as 26 percent stated an obvious no. At the same time, the ratio for Hispanic or white parents was much lower at 13 and 15 percent, respectively. 

The health experts have corroborated how the hesitancy stems from uncertainties. This is not exactly as outrightly opposing and leaves a flicker of hope. One can lead to pediatricians engaging in talks and educating the parents by bestowing them with knowledge and guidance. 

Bethany Robertson, the co-founder of ParentsTogether, stated that a much longer time is needed for parents to be comfortable enough in her brief on the vaccine hesitancy. Thus, believing the vaccine’s efficacy in protecting both the children as well as the community as a whole. 

A pediatrician with the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, Clarissa Dudley, was determined that the hesitancy conversation needs to be altered. Thus, encouraging more and more to get their vaccinations done. 

The terminology needs to be changed to being thoughtful rather than citing parents to be vaccine-hesitant. Thereby avoiding the process of shaming the parents.

The target should be to reach out with the help of trusted messengers and dispel misinformation. This can be done by utilizing the children’s pediatrician or even the community leaders.

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